Addiction Treatment: Where to Start

A new guide, published by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, provides resources to individuals seeking information on drug or alcohol addiction treatment and recovery. Once an individual recognizes that he or she has a problem with drugs or alcohol, many are uncertain what to do next. Treatment is the often the best option.

Here are a couple of questions most people ask when seeking treatment:

  • How much does drug treatment cost?
  • Which drug treatment programs are the best?
  • Will alcohol treatment work?
  • Do I have to stop drinking completely?
  • Will I have to go out of state?
  • Will I need to take a leave of absence from work?
  • How will my co-workers react?
  • Will insurance cover my treatment?
  • Which is better: residential treatment or outpatient counseling?
  • How long does treatment take?
  • What happens after treatment?

The new publication, Seeking Drug Abuse Treatment: Know What to Ask, is an informative guide for those thinking about addiction treatment for the first time.

Not all treatment facilities are created equal. Some are better than others. This guide provides valuable knowledge that can be used to make an informed decision.

New Pharmaceutical Treatment for Opiate Addiction

Probuphine, a new tool to combat opiate addiction, is under review by the Food and Drug Administration. The new drug is designed to be implanted under the skin to deliver a continuous dose of buprenorphine. This may prove to be more effective than sub-lingual buprenorphine, which can be traded for drugs or used to keep opiate addicts out of physical withdrawal when their preferred opiates are unavailable. The drug, developed by Titan Pharmaceuticals Inc., is not yet available commercially, but could prove to be valuable weapon in the war on addiction.

Asking for Help

Asking for help is not easy. Our culture places enormous pressures on us to perform at peak levels most of the time. We are expected to be able to solve our problems ourselves. Self-reliance is a fine concept, but sometimes we need another perspective on our problems. Some problems, like addiction, are bigger than us. We need to look outside ourselves for the solution.

Asking for help is not easy. But it can be a bridge to a different way of living.

Alcohol Treatment: 5 Questions to Ask

Seeking treatment for alcohol abuse can be an intimidating process. It shouldn’t be.

The medical establishment characterizes addiction as a disease. We don’t feel ashamed to seek treatment for diabetes or heart disease. Why should alcohol abuse be any different?

The National Institute on Drug Abuse recommends that individuals shopping around for addiction treatment, for either alcohol or drug abuse, ask the following five questions to potential treatment providers:

  1. Does the program use treatments backed by scientific evidence?
  2. Does the program tailor treatment to the needs of individual clients?
  3. Does the program adapt as the client’s needs change?
  4. Is the duration of the treatment sufficient?
  5. How do twelve-step or other recovery programs fit into drug addiction treatment?

Alcohol Use and Women

Addiction to alcohol occurs at a much faster rate in women than in men who abuse alcohol. Women metabolize alcohol different than men and hormone levels in females may also make them more susceptible to alcohol’s effects. As a result of excessive alcohol use, certain types of medical complications can result and include:

  • Heart disease and related heart complications
  • Poor nutrition
  • Menstruation complications such as early menopause
  • Fertility and childbirth complications
  • Breast cancer
  • Liver problems
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cancer
  • Brain damage such as shrinkage of the brain and dementia
  • High death rate from suicide and accidents

If you are concerned about your alcohol use or that of someone you care about, seeking the help of a professional who specializes in substance abuse treatment could be lifesaving.

Addiction Counseling: First Things First

What is addiction counseling? What is it like? People who struggle with addiction issues often have great difficulty talking about their, use, misuse, or abuse of alcohol and other drugs. An addiction counselor is someone skilled at these types of difficult conversations. An addiction counselor has a high level of knowledge and experience in the areas of drugs, alcohol, and the abuse of drugs or alcohol. Most importantly, addiction counselors understand the complex ways that alcohol and drug abuse affect an individual’s relationships: with himself or herself, with a spouse, with an employer, with God. An addiction counselor seeks to build a trusting relationship with the client in the hopes that this relationship will help the client make changes that once seemed impossible.

 

Expanding the Pinnacle Counseling team!

There are exciting things happening at Pinnacle Counseling. We have updated our website to feature the new additions to our counseling staff, Rachel Nachtigal, LPC and Joel Gray, LPC. They are proud members of the Pinnacle Counseling team, both specializing in Mental Health and Relationship Counseling.

You can follow all of the news straight from the source by checking out our website at http://pinnaclecounselingnwa.com/. Or by following us on twitter at @Pinnacle_Cares or liking us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PinnacleCounseling. So check them out and get to know us better. We look forward to hearing from you.

Addiction Treatment: Five Myths

“If addicts could stop on their own they wouldn’t be addicts.”

The above statement is true. Addicts need help to quit. They need effective inpatient or outpatient addiction treatment. Addiction is a disease that can be treated. But without treatment many addicts and alcoholics die of the illness.

Addicts and alcoholics need all the help they can get from loved ones. The best help available is treatment for the disease of addiction.

Here are five myths about addiction. Are any of these myths preventing a loved one from getting the help they need?

1. Addicts and alcoholics need to reach rock bottom before they can accept help.

2. Addiction is a willpower problem. They could stop, if they really wanted to.

3. People don’t need treatment. They stop when they are truly motivated.

4. Treatment doesn’t work.

5. People must want treatment in order for it to be effective.

 

Check out our newest welcome video

As just one new feature of the Pinnacle website, we now have a new welcome video. The short clip explains who we are as a mental healthcare team and why we are proud of what we do at Pinnacle Counseling. For more information, click here to view the clip and we look forward to seeing you soon.