Generalized Anxiety vs. Trauma Based Anxiety

Anxiety is an oversimplified word used to cover an entire group of different types of anxiety disorders. Not all anxiety is the same and neither is the treatment for them.

According to our therapists at Pinnacle Counseling, Anxiety Disorders are a group of mental disorders characterized by significant feelings of anxiety and fear. Anxiety is a worry about future events, and fear is a reaction to current events. These feelings may cause physical symptoms, such as a fast heart rate and shakiness. There are several anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, panic disorder, and selective mutism. The disorder differs by what results in the symptoms. People often have more than one anxiety disorder.

Trauma-based anxiety is generally considered to be under the category of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD rather than in the group of anxiety disorders. When we hear PTSD usually the first thing that comes to mind is soldiers returning from war or victims of extreme violence such as a mass shooting. PTSD can be from a one-time event or an ongoing situation. There are many types of situations that can cause emotional and psychological trauma – an accident, natural disaster, a violent attack, losing a loved one, physical or sexual abuse, etc. Being a witness to a traumatic event, such as a horrific accident, can have as much impact as being personally involved in the event.

When we experience generalized anxiety our mind/body is responding to a fear of what might happen that may or may not be realistic. Some anxiety is normal and healthy. It helps us prepare for an unknown event, like going on a job interview or to quickly react to a potential threat. But when it is happening on most days about a wide range of situations or issues, it can start negatively affecting all aspects of daily life.
When experiencing trauma-based anxiety our body is responding based on what it already knows can happen. It has experienced the worst-case scenario and knows what can happen and no longer feels safe. Symptoms can include flashbacks, nightmares, irritability, feeling faint, sweating, shaking, panic attacks, and can result in avoidance of situations that may cause these to happen.

Many of the symptoms of generalized anxiety overlap with the symptoms of trauma-based anxiety. Common symptoms of both are lack of focus, depression, difficulty sleeping, losing interest in the things you used to enjoy, drinking or using drugs to avoid the stressful feelings and memories. It is not uncommon to experience more than one type of anxiety at the same time as PTSD.

If you have experienced a trauma and have unsuccessfully been treated for anxiety, there is hope. There are effective therapy techniques to treat PTSD. You can contact our office for an appointment to get help in managing your symptoms.

 

COVID-19 Update

7/27/20

Dear Valued Clients,

Due to COVID-19, at this time we are seeing clients mostly via telehealth. For your privacy and security, we use the HIPAA compliant encrypted Zoom technology. Many insurance plans are covering telehealth 100% and waiving member cost shares. We are happy to check your benefits for you to see if your plan is participating.

We do have some therapists offering in-office sessions on a limited basis. For your health and safety, we are following CDC guidelines such as wearing masks, taking temperature, social distancing, extra sanitation, etc.

We are here to help, especially during this difficult time. For more information, please call our office at 479-268-4142.